Survival

By ganesh / October, 14, 2012 / 24 comments

After the NCF annual meet I returned to Valparai. It was the 31st of July and I was to leave for Bangalore that evening. I got a call saying that one of the herds that we have been following is out in the open and a female had given birth that morning!

Elephant herd in a tea estate

Anand (assistant) and I rushed to the see the herd, but by then, they had moved off with the new born into the coffee plantation, which is much denser in vegetation. So, we climbed a hillock to get a view of the elephants. My hands began to tremble with excitement when I saw the little calf emerge for the first time, partially hidden safely, from under the belly of its mother. Its pink eyes looked BIG compared to its body and its tiny trunk was wriggling around. The mother was a young elephant and an older one stayed by her side the entire time.

First glimpse of the new born

When the wind changed direction, the older female caught our scent. She showed her irritation by uprooting a plant and throwing some mud over herself. Then they slowly moved deeper into the coffee plantation. Since we did not want to disturb them, we did not follow them and returned to the office. I headed back to Bangalore that evening.

Elephants relaxing in a swamp adjacent to a tea plantation

I was at the SCCS in Bangalore when I got a call that startled me. I heard that when this herd had gone to the river, the newborn had slipped and had been washed away by the strong current.

 

River and the fragmented forests

To my relief, a few hours later, I heard that a few plantation workers who had seen this happen, jumped in to the river and helped it to safety on land. The Forest Department and media persons contacted us for advice on how to best handle the situation–whether to just look after it or to release it with the herd? We suggested to keep as few people as possible with the calf (to reduce trauma because of human presence & to reduce the possibility of the herd rejecting the calf due to human smell on it) to start with.

After consulting with other biologists at SCCS, we suggested the calf be fed with a mix of baby gripe water, electral & mineral water but only if it would not take long for it to be reunited with it’s family. Importantly, fresh elephant dung rubbed over the calf to mask the smell of humans. Later in the evening the calf was taken to the place where the herd was and left at some distance from the herd.

Apparently, a little later, amidst a lot of trumpeting by the herd, the mother stepped forward, went to the calf, smelt it and immediately let the calf suckle! From what I heard it seemed like the elephants were celebrating! It was really nice that the forest department and the locals took so much interest and care in wanting to rescue and re-unite the new born calf with its family.

I returned to Valparai a couple of days later and started following the herd that had split into two hoping to get a glimpse of the new born. Early next morning, the anti-poaching watchers called to inform me that there was a herd of elephants in the tea fields and they were behaving in a strange manner, looking disturbed and aggressive. We requested the tea workers who were working close by to move elsewhere and not to get too close to the elephants since they seemed already stressed by something.

Elephants stressed and huddled together with the calf on the ground

By the time I reached the site, there were only a few elephants around. A few tea bushes had been pulled out and the five elephants seemed tense. The watchers said they had heard the call of an elephant calf a little earlier. With some effort, to our horror, we saw a calf and realized that it was the same calf which had fallen into the river, now lying down motionless. The old female was trying hard for about two hours to get the calf up on its feet. Many times, the large female would walk some 100 m away, then turn around and rush back towards the calf trumpeting. Clearly, she did not want to abandon it or us to get any closer to the calf. Finally, even she gave up and started moving away. They may have moved away due to our presence as well, although we were about a 100 m away. We will never know.

 

The adult stands guard unwilling to leave the calf (on ground) behind.

Finally after all the elephants had left the place, we approached the calf. It was raining heavily and the track leading to it was very slippery. We found the calf lying at the edge of the tea bushes covered in a thick layer of slush. It seemed to be gasping for air, and its breath was sounding labored. Things did not look good.

First look of the calf

I called Divya and Sridhar (NCF colleagues) to inform them about what we had just found. The Forest Range Officer instructed his team to assist us with everything we needed as there was no resident veterinarian in Valparai. Once Divya and Sridhar arrived, we tried to administer some basic medication to help the calf gain some energy by consulting our veterinarian friends over the phone.

Medication being administered

Its body temperature was very low and we had a hard time in administering the medications. We were then required to find a shelter where we could bring up the body temperature and then help the calf as much as possible. The Bombay Burma Trading Company General Manager Mr Suresh Menon and the Manager Mr Tarun helped us in moving the calf to a near-by bus stop, a make-shift dispensary, with power, hot water, doctors and other arrangements required to nurse the calf.

After a few hours of heating up the place, feeding it little by little a mix of things as advised by the vets, holding it up to be able to breath more easily, it looked a lot more comfortable than the time when we had found it. Our hopes of its survival were raised. The forest department staff and the local people worked very hard to ensure that the calf would survive.

 But by the evening, the news had got around and lots of people began to gather, both out of curiosity and concern. Crowd management was becoming tough. However, the calf also seemed to have regained some of its strength. And it was time for the next step – release.

Scouting elephants to re-unite the calf

In the mean while, our assistants had kept track of the natal herd, which, by evening had started to move towards the larger patch of forest near by. There was little time to re-unite the calf with its family. After dark, the calf was taken to the herd in a canter and set down on a path that the elephants were headed towards. Everyone left the area so as to not disrupt the movement of the elephants. We left hoping for a miracle, and hoping to see the calf reunited with his mother and herd the next morning.

 

However, it was not to be. The calf was found dead in the same spot.

Despite our best intentions and efforts, the calf had not pulled through. It was just 10 days old. The forest department staff were very disheartened. They had developed a special liking to this calf. They were not fully convinced of the need to try to reunite it with the herd. They felt that sending in into captivity might have probably saved his life.

We felt that the herd probably knew that the calf would not make it. They stood with the calf for as long as they could and their grief at abandoning it had been evident. We had thought that we could save it. But we were far from being able to ….. we just did not know enough – about its condition or even the basic technique of how to handle a situation like this.

We were also in a dilemma as to whether we should intervene in this play of nature or not? Do we know enough to do it – both in terms of technical expertise as well as nature? Had the mother been too young? Was the calf therefore quite weak and not so healthy? Had the earlier drowning caused some other internal damage? Aren’t deaths such as these, as long as not directly mediated by us humans (electrocution, poisoning, etc.), a natural process?

From an ethical angle, since it seemed like a natural death to us, it seemed acceptable. We felt quite strongly that a ‘graceful‘ death in the wild is better than a ‘disgraceful‘ life in a camp. Is it always only about survival? Is it not about how the life is lived? Would we even be aware of the on-goings in herds that are mostly in the forests? How many calves are born and how many even make it to adulthood? Would the elephants have managed to pull him up had the place been somewhere else where there were no people? Should we not restrain ourselves and not intervene in most cases when we find young ones abandoned or dying? Unless, we are sure that the life we are going to give it after ‘rescue’ is better than death itself. I am certain we could have addressed the situation better if there was a specialist veterinarian based out of Valparai.

But one main thing was that everyone wanted to save the calf. No one had anger or irritation against these elephants, despite the damages they sometimes do. The people are really tolerant here and we need to foster it.

24 Responses to Survival

  • S. RAMANI

    The story of the little one is described with narrative photographs from its birth to death is really moving. Sorry you all tried your best to save the calf but could not succeed.

  • Brinda

    Sad to hear that the calf could not make it despite all the hard work you guys put in :(

  • Suheim

    A sad but evocative story. Animals are essentially so so wonderful it breaks ones heart to see them suffer.

  • Vikas Navaratna

    A really moving narration. You did all that you could but nature had other plans. May the herd get one more calf like this which would be healthy and grow to be come an adult wild elephant someday.

  • Meg'o meg

    Its heartening to know how the calf managed to survive its way through so much…nonetheless,nature always has its way through things.. and this incident just makes it more evident.

  • shiva

    So true that we still don’t know. But is it possible really to question a ‘mother’s’ judgement ? This case is little unique, maybe the herd would have not found the calf from the river. But then I think your question is valid. Better to die in nature than live in cap. But to say the truth we will never know. But how many other things happen that is influenced by humans? Those must be avoided.

  • Atul Sinai Borker

    Very well documented and narrated. You guys did a great job.

    Sad that the calf could not survive.

  • Pranay Chandra

    Please keep the good work going. Sorry the calf could not make it.A laudable effort put up by you and your team.

  • Dilip

    This is a very moving incident indeed. You & everybody put best efforts for a good cause. Maybe this would be a learning in future support to our wildlife. I can totally relate to the sentiments & thoughts you would have gone through during this.

    Thank you for waking us from monotony.

    Dilip

  • Venkata Adhikarla

    Wonderful and moving story.. superb pics.. probably places like Valparai where people are supportive and want to protect the wildlife around deserves specialist veterinarian to be available..

  • Manoj

    Touching story, it really is not a sad ending; it’s wonderful to see the valiant effort by all you people. Great work guys! Most times, it’s best to do one’s best and let nature take a call.

  • Saptha Girish.M.K

    Though at times we are on crossroads about intervening in natures way!!!!! it was a g8 effort to save this little one…but destiny had its own way. However, the positive side is that people were tolerant about the whole rescue act and involved themselves to save this calf, this gives some hope for WL in future!!!!!!!

  • Pavithra

    Wonderful narration … felt really sorry for the baby elephant though.

  • Jalick

    Good effort buddy, your team and you did the best thing and that matters.

  • Javed GS

    Touching Story ! The instinct to survive, the parental nature and the thought of helping the weak and lost, survives. No matter how much damage the herd does, everyone’s heart melts when they see a young one hurt.

    It is a great effort by all the officials, the volunteers and the public. Thank you.
    This instills hope !

  • Prasanna Hegde

    Gratitude sir,
    Thanks for sharing such a moving and motivating indecent.

  • JN Prasad

    Hi, you have touched, moved and inspired by your actions and sharing with us so detailed manner. Hats off. Keep up the good work. best regards, JN Prasad

  • Rana-Sugandhi

    A touching story. It was heartening to read about the love for the elephants. Guess those questions will always remain unanswered….

  • Pranam Patel

    Oh Shucks! Sad to hear The calf did not make it!
    Respect to all the people who made an effort in this case!
    Best wishes
    Pranam Patel

  • kk

    good work

  • T. Manickavasakam

    We have taken their place very often.. they are struggling ..

  • Amul Mutha

    A tragic story very beautifully conveyed through the write up and all the more with the photographs. Keep up the amazing work

  • Sharma BC

    Hi Ganesh,Its really a tragic story, although such incidents are common in nature. Despite all your efforts, he could not survive. That’s why they say, “Man proposes but God disposes”. Thanks for sharing this story with all.

    regards,
    sharma.

  • Leana Geraghty

    I truly commend you on your valiant effort to save this infant but God and the elephants knew best. It never would have been strong enough to keep up with the herd and would have died a painful death from predators. Had you been able to save its’ life, it would not have been strong enough to endure the abuse of a captive elephant.
    This baby died a peaceful death in the wild where it belongs.
    Thank you for your kindness to this baby!

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